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One of our members, Pattie Baker, recently published her book, Food For my Daughters. You can buy it here.

Product Description

 

Food for My Daughters: what one mom did when the towers fell (and what you can do, too) includes thought-provoking stories, versatile recipes, and actionable tips about what you can do to grow food, community and knowledge, and to better prepare your children (and yourself!) for a changing world. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of every copy of Food for My Daughters will be donated to help grow food for those in need. Go to www.foodformydaughters.comto hear excerpts and see a video release about the book.

 

About the Author

 

Pattie Baker is a writer specializing in sustainability, and an urban farmer who grows food, community, and knowledge for those in need. She has been published in Edible Atlanta, New Life Journal, and Urban Farm magazines, and blogs at http://www.foodshedplanet.com. She lives in metro-Atlanta with her husband and two daughters, who keep helping her “learn as she grows.”

 

 

 

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New Board of Directors

CHAIR: Don Converse (term expires 8/13)

Muriel Knope (term expires 8/13)

Nicole Maslanka (term expires 8/13)

Therese Meschede (term expires 8/13)

TREASURER: Angela Minyard (term expires 8/13)

Rod Pittman (term expires 8/12)

Susan Wynn (term expires 8/13)

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Squash Bugs

Reports of squash bugs in the garden are coming in, and the damage they cause can make plants susceptible to disease.

This is a squash bug:

This are its eggs:

These are the eggs hatching:

These are the nymphs:

This is the damage squash bugs cause:

The best was to control squash bugs is to cultivate a healthy garden and diverse ecosystem. Physical controls include dropping the bugs in soapy water and smashing the eggs. If that doesn’t work and you’d like to try a spray, Mother Earth News recommends Neem as an ORGANIC pest control. (My favorite place to buy organic garden supplies and get advice is Farmer D’s garden center.)

Additionally, these repellant plans might deter squash bugs: catnip, tansy, radishes, tansy, nasturtiums, marigolds, beebalm, or mints.

The good news is that once your plants are well established, squash bugs aren’t such a big deal. The larger plants can handle a little nibbling.

(Photos copied from this website. IGNORE their insecticidal remedies because we require ORGANIC practices.)

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Van and Sally Malone, garden members and Food Pantry volunteers, are featured in this Patch article about their front yard vegetable garden. They are such great ambassadors for this movement.

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Consider contacting our mayor and council members to voice support for our community garden and its master plan.

Click here to view the complete master plan: Dunwoody_Community_Garden_Master_Plan-1

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This week we donated 58 pounds to the food pantry.

Donations came from the home gardens of Scott and Mary, Joe, Sally and Van, and Stacey; from the community garden beds of Ashley, Ann, and Lisa; from our dedicated food pantry beds; and from the Georgetown Community Garden, the newest volunteer-run community garden in the City of Dunwoody.

This week’s donated value: $287.50

We’ve donated 318 pounds of organically-grown local produce so far this year. We have provided a donated value just shy of $2,000.

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A Portion of Today's Donation

This week’s donation was well over 13 pounds. Here’s what was harvested for Malachi’s:

  • Tomatoes (Thanks, Kathy, for nearly 5 pounds!)
  • Cucumbers (Thanks, Amy and Kristin!)
  • The first hot pepper
  • Yellow squash (Thanks, Kristin!)
  • Basil
  • Mixed herbs, including lemon balm, mint, oregano, curry herb, Thai basil, lemon thyme, and tarragon (Thanks, Pattie!)
  • Greens, including salad mix, chard, kale (Thanks, Sally & Van!)
  • Beets

 

If you are going on vacation, have an ample harvest, or just want to share, please let us know. Sign up on the sheet inside the mailbox or email us. Indicate what veggies and how much to harvest from your plot.

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